Justice Rising Season 3

Justice Rising Podcast

The Intercommunity Peace & Justice Center presents our podcast, Justice Rising.

What if conversations had the power to transform society? Justice Rising, a new podcast created by the Intercommunity Peace & Justice Center, is setting out to do just that! In each episode, we will highlight people and organizations doing justice work by exploring a central question: How can we bring about healing, liberation, and transformation in our church, our world, ourselves, and our communities?

How to Tune in!
Listen and subscribe on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or Podbean
(Search: Justice Rising Intercommunity Peace and Justice Center).

Theme Music: Amerika by Audiobinger, Free Music Archive | Photo of Cecilia Flores for Justice Rising © Chris Rylee

. . . . .
Season 3 with Cecilia Flores
. . . . .
“I Am Community” with Giselle Cárcamo

Giselle Cárcamo portraitWhat does it mean to be community? In celebration of Latinx Heritage Month, Cecilia spends time with Giselle Cárcamo, proud peruana and community leader. In this episode, she shares stories from her life in Peru and how these moments influence the way she lives into her calling as an agent of change. Giselle will inspire you to choose vulnerability over comfort and redefine previous understandings of community!

Giselle is a social justice advocator who coordinates the Justice for Women program at IPJC, she is also an adjunct faculty at the University of Washington School of Social Work, and the Master Trainer for the BASTA Coalition of Washington. Her professional stance toward community organizing is to engage in community practice based on The Strengths-Based Perspective and geared to empower people to use their creative power in order to innovate strategies to build a stronger sense of community and civic engagement. Giselle thrives to provide equality of opportunity and meaningful participation in decision making for all people. For her, community involvement is a participatory endeavor in which indigenous knowledge is honored and considered, power differentials are consciously shifted, and working across differences and coalition building are encouraged.

In This Episode:  

  • Find out more about Basta’s efforts to eliminate farmworker sexual harassment through education and advocacy at bastacoalition.org
. . . . .
Meet Justice Rising’s New Host & Producer Cecilia Flores! 

Justice Rsing podcast Season 3In this episode, The Intercommunity Peace and Justice Center’s (IPJC) Executive Director, Will Rutt interviews Cecilia. Cecilia shares about her experience working at the intersection between faith and justice, her cultural background as a Filipina American, and gives a sneak peek season three of Justice Rising!  

Cecilia, daughter of Evelio and Marie, mother of Kiara and Jacob. Cecilia is the daughter of Filipino immigrants, who grew up in in the San Francisco bay area. She has spent over 15 years working with communities of faith to address issues of poverty and injustice in the US and in Central America through the formation and development of youth, young adults, and women. She holds a Master of Arts in Global Development & Social Justice from St. John’s University, and currently works as a community organizer with Sacramento ACT. She also serves as the chair of the Young Adult Multicultural Advisory Committee to the USCCB and is a consultant to the USCCB’s Committee on Cultural Diversity. 

In This Episode:  

  • To learn more about the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Cultural Diversity in the Church and Journeying Together, please visit: usccb.org
  • Visit sacact.org to read about Cecilia’s organizing work for Sacramento Area Congregations Together (ACT) which aims to empower “ordinary people to identify and change the conditions that create economic and racial injustice. 

Find IPJC on Socials! Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter // @ipjcseattle 

. . . . .
Season 2 with Samantha Yanity
. . . . .
Catholic Climate Advocacy with Anna Robertson, Anna Johnson, Emily Burke & Teresa Tsosie

How can the Catholic Church fight for climate justice and embrace the voice of young people in this work? On this week’s episode, host Samantha Yanity sits down with four young women working for environmental justice. Samantha, Anna R., Emily, Teresa and Anna J.* discuss the impacts of environmental degradation, the ways that each of their communities are impacted, especially young people and indigenous communities, and how, grounded in their faith, they feel called to respond to this crisis. Over the last year, the four of them, along with over 30 young adults have been developing a forthcoming curriculum oriented towards young Catholic climate advocates. This work seeks to provide training, tools, and formation for youth and young adults to ground themselves in spirituality rooted in creation, personal transformation and education, and social action and structural advocacy to take action to create a more sustainable and healthier climate.

Anna Robertson is the Director of Youth & Young Adult Mobilization at the Catholic Climate Covenant. Annapatrice Johnson is the US Mission Formation Unit Manage and Young Adult Empowerment team leader for the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers. Emily Burke is currently the social media manager at Catholic Climate Covenant and a doctoral student at University of Wisconsin-Madison in the joint Sociology and Community and Environmental Sociology program. Teresa Tsosie is the Director of Religious Education at St. Jude Parish in Tuba City, Arizona. 

*Episode Note – Speakers enter the conversation in the following order: Anna Robertson, Emily Burke, Teresa Tsosie, Anna Johnson. 

We discussed:  

. . . . .
Protecting Sacred Water with Luke Henkel
Luke-Henkel-Protect the Water

How can we as people of faith be water protectors and land preservers? On this week episode, Samantha sits down with Luke Henkel, to discuss his experience in the movement to stope Line 3 and broader work on environmental justice. Luke Henkel is an activist and water protector, former Divine Word Missionary (SVD) Brother, current graduate student, and lifelong spiritual seeker. He spent much of summer 2021 on the frontlines and in the resistance camps of northern Minnesota against Line 3 and is actively engaged in fighting fossil fuel expansion in the Pacific Northwest, with the Protectors of the Salish Sea. He is currently pursuing his Master’s in Climate Justice remotely through Glasgow Caledonian University.

We discussed:  

A Matter of Spirit, Spring 2022 Edition – Read Luke’s article Water Gives Life: Reflections on Line 3

. . . . .
3 Part Lenten Series: Expanding Our Images of God

Join us for a 3-part Lenten series on iconography. What is iconography? And what does it have to do with Lent? Iconography is an ancient tradition designed to help people enter into a deeper prayer life. Icons are actually prayers themselves that are read much like a book. Unlike books that use words to communicate a message, icons use imagery to teach and instruct theology and scripture. When we “read” an icon, we are entering into the imagery through our imagination, which is a form of prayer.

During Lent, we enter a season of prayer that draws us deeper into communion with God. In our faith tradition, especially during Lent and Holy Week, icons are traditionally used as a tool for deeper engagement with the Divine. But, there’s one major problem with ancient icons. They don’t represent the inclusivity or diversity of the Body of Christ! So, how can we draw closer to God in prayer with sacred imagery that feels so distant?

On these next three episodes, we will unpack some of these ideas about sacred imagery and rethink how we can see ourselves as the Body of Christ.

. . . . .
PART 3 OF LENTEN SERIES
The Universality of God with Rev. Dr. Mark Bozzuti-Jones

What if the Church became a space of mutuality, was grounded in deep practice of community, and was an experience God’s unending love? On this week episode, Samantha sits down with Rev. Dr. Mark Bozzuti-Jones, to close out this three-part Lenten series on iconography exploring these themes and how sacred imagery can help us experience the universality of God. Samantha and Rev. Mark dive deep into a conversation about Kelly Latimore’s icon, The Trinity, which he commissioned for his personal collection with the hope of challenging us to rethink images of the Divine and create a Church that is a equitable and liberative for all people. Rev. Dr. Mark Bozzuti-Jones is an Episcopal priest at Trinity Church Wall Street in New York City. He serves as the Priest and Director of Spiritual Formation of Trinity’s Retreat Center in West Cornwall, CT. A former Jesuit priest from Jamaica, Mark has missionary experience in Belize, Brazil, and Guyana. He believes that prayer, silence, and rest, deepen our connection to God. Prayer and silence help us to name the pain, face the realities of our time, and claim the Way of Love for all people. He is an award-winning author of several books, most recently: Absalom Jones: Leader and Guide and one on the Spirituals called, Face to the Rising Sun: Reflections on Spirituals and Justice.

We discussed:  

  • Trinity by Andrei Rublev vs The Trinity by Kelly Latimore
  • Never Said a Mumbalin Word ( Rev. Dr. Mark Bozzuti-Jones)
  • Face to the Rising Sun: Reflections on Spirituals and Justice. (Rev. Dr. Mark Bozzuti-Jones)
. . . . .
PART 2 OF LENTEN SERIES
Communal Prayer with Kelly Latimore

What would happen if our Lenten practice invited us to transform the way we see ourselves and the church? What if we stepped into the doors of the church and were able to see ourselves and our neighbors in the pews next to us depicted in its sacred icons? On part two of our three-part Lenten series, Samantha sits down with iconographer Kelly Latimore and discusses how iconography provides us a means to enter into communal and personal prayer. As we dive deeper into our Lenten practice, using icons as a tool for prayerful practice, we can enter into what Kelly refers to as, “holy ponderings.” Kelly Latimore started painting icons in 2011 while he was a member of the Common Friars from 2009–2013. His collective work is about “being more connected: to ourselves, each other, our surrounding community and the land.”

We discussed:  

. . . . .
PART 1 OF LENTEN SERIES
Modern Day Saints with Gracie Morbitzer

Ancient icons portray the Body of Christ as predominately white and expressionless. But what would the Church look like if we could see ourselves represented in sacred art? On this week’s episode, I sit down with Gracie Morbitzer of Modern Saints to kick off our three-part Lenten series on iconography, as she shares about her work creating icons that remind us of ourselves. Gracie is a recent graduate of the Columbus College of Art & Design where she studied Interior Architecture and Design with a focus in exhibit and set design. Her mission is to “re-imagine these extraordinary people as modern, everyday humans . . . because that is exactly what they were, and they remind us of ourselves. They show us that we can all be saints just like them. The saints were hopeless, spunky, terrified, lonely, individualistic, rebellious, progressive, loving, ambitious, counter-cultural, or boisterous outcasts and sinners who reached beyond themselves and made the world and themselves so much better.” She lives in Columbus, Ohio.

We discussed:  

. . . . .
Transformative Justice with Dr. Gilda Sheppard

What is transformative justice? How do we come to a place of personal and societal healing? These are some of the questions Samantha unpacks with award-winning filmmaker Dr. Gilda Sheppard. Dr. Sheppard has screened her documentaries throughout the United States, and internationally in Ghana, West Africa, at the Festival Afrique Cannes Film Festival, and in Germany at the International Black Film Festival in Berlin. Sheppard is a 2017 Hedgebrook Fellow for documentary film and is a 2019 recipient of an Artist Trust Fellowship.

Dr. Sheppard’s documentaries include stories of resilience of Liberian women and children refugees in Ghana; stories of three generations of Black families in an urban neighborhood; and a film ethnography of stories from folklore started by Zora Neale Hurston in Alabama’s AfricaTown. For over a decade, Dr. Sheppard has taught sociology classes in Washington State prisons and is a co-founder and faculty member for Freedom Education for Puget Sound (FEPPS), an organization offering college credited courses at Washington Correctional Center for Women. Dr. Sheppard is a member of the faculty at The Evergreen State College Tacoma Campus.

We discussed:  

. . . . .
Season 1 with Samantha Yanity
. . . . .
Mercy from the Cells with Jennifer Kelly

What does it look like to live out God’s mercy? And, how do we extend that mercy to and from the prison cells? On this week’s episode, Samantha sits down with Jennifer Kelly, the founder and Director of Jesuit Restorative Justice Initiative Northwest (JRJINW), a work of Jesuits West Province. JRJI NW brings Ignatian spirituality and methodology to correctional facilities through a variety of programs, as well as engages in education, advocacy and action for social change in the wider community. JRJI NW honors the unique dignity of each person and promotes and advocates for policies and practices that are just, restorative and healing rather than punitive. Jennifer has been a member of the Seattle L ’ Arche community for 38 years, 32 of which she was employed by L ’ Arche—as an Assistant, Board Member, Executive Director and Director of Formation. She is a singer, songwriter, teacher, speaker, spiritual and retreat director. She has extensive experience in mission and vision development, the support and advancement of intentional communities, founding faith-based/non-profits organizations and the creation of support structures. However, her greatest passion may be supporting individuals in discovering their own deepest desires, interior freedom and inestimable worth.

We discussed:  

. . . . .
Love on the Border with Tracey Horan, SP

It seems, at times, that there is no humanity on the border, but Tracey Horan, SP from the Kino Border Initiative, shows everyone that God’s love abounds even in the face of injustice. On this week’s episode, Samantha sits down with Tracey Horan, SP as she discusses Title 42, the cruelty that she has witnessed on the border, and how people of faith can walk with and welcome the stranger. Tracey Horan is a Sister of Providence of Saint Mary-of-the-Woods, Indiana and serves as the Associate Director of Education and Advocacy for the Kino Border Initiative in Nogales, Sonora and Arizona, where she has lived and worked since 2019. Sister Tracey has ministered with Latinx migrant communities in a variety of contexts for over a decade. She previously worked as a teacher and then as a community organizer, focusing on voting access, deportation defense, court accompaniment with migrants, and detangling Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) from local law enforcement. Sister Tracey recently celebrated seven years as a religious sister.

We discussed:  

. . . . .
Charity vs Justice with Crystal Cardona

What is the difference between charity and justice? Sometimes, in our earnest attempt to pursue acts of justice, we might lose sight of what accompaniment should look like. On this week’s episode, Samantha sits down with Crystal Cardona, who serves as the Campus Minister for Outreach and Justice and teaches in the department of Women, Gender and Ethnic Studies at Saint Martin’s University, as she shares how she teaches justice work to her students through her experience in years of direct support work. Crystal is originally from California and relocated to the Pacific Northwest to attend Saint Martin’s University. After graduating from Saint Martin’s with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Cultural Anthropology, she completed a year of service as a Jesuit Volunteer in Phoenix, AZ and received a Master of Social Justice from Loyola University of Chicago while working at a mental health agency full-time. One of her roles Saint Martin’s University is to serve as the advisor to the Catholic Relief Services Student Chapter. She had the opportunity to travel with Catholic Relief Services University Delegation in 2019 to Rwanda.

We discussed:  

. . . . .
The Spirituality of Organizing with Michael Alcantara

Community organizer or rabble rouser? Peacebuilder or troublemaker? Community organizer, Michael Alcantara has taken some heat for his organizing efforts, but that hasn’t stopped him from pursuing justice for the sake of restoring human dignity to his Filipino siblings. On this week’s episode Samantha and Michael sit down and discuss how community organizing is inherently spiritual and how people of faith can respond to the crises in the Philippines. Michael is a member of PUSO Seattle (Philippine US Solidarity Organization) and ICHRP (International Coalition for Human for Human Rights in the Philippines). He is a graduate of Seattle University, and recently wrote an article for A Matter of Spirit Summer 2021 issue.

We discussed:  

. . . . .
Finding Our Purpose with Dr. Patrick Reyes

Samantha sits down with Dr. Patrick Reyes to discuss how decentering and disrupting white supremacy culture allows communities of color to find their purpose. Dr. Patrick B. Reyes is the author of the bestselling book The Purpose Gap: Empowering Communities of Color to Find Meaning and Thrive, as well as the award-winning book Nobody Cries When We Die: God, Community, and Surviving to Adulthood. A Chicano educator, administrator, and institutional strategist, he is the Senior Director of Learning Design at the Forum for Theological Exploration, Patrick is the president-elect of the Religious Education Association and serves on several boards in the education and the non-profit sectors supporting the next generation of BIPOC leaders and educators. Patrick holds a Doctorate and Master of Arts from Claremont School of Theology, a Master of Divinity from Boston University School of Theology, and is a proud graduate of the California State education system, graduating from California State University at Sacramento (Sacramento State). He is also host of the Sound of the Genuine podcast. Sound of the Genuine, a production of the Forum for Theological Exploration, seeks to explore meaning and purpose. You can listen to Sound of the Genuine on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, and Audible. You can learn more about Patrick at thepurposegap.com.

We discussed:  

  • The Purpose Gap: Empowering Communities of Color to Find Meaning and Thrive
  • Nobody Cries When We Die: God, Community, and Surviving to Adulthood
  • https://fteleaders.org
. . . . .
Education Equity with Marcos Gonzales

In this episode, Samantha sits down with Marcos Gonzales to discuss how we can achieve education equity in our society. Marcos wrote about teaching through the pandemic in the Spring 2021 issue of A Matter of Spirit. Marcos Gonzales serves as the Director of Trauma-Informed Education at Chicago Jesuit Academy. His pursuit of a faith that does justice has taken him from the islands of Micronesia as a Jesuit Volunteer to the streets of Los Angeles working at Homeboy Industries as a case manager. He received his BA in theology and master’s degree in education from Loyola Marymount University and completed his master’s degree in social work at Loyola University, Chicago.

We discussed:  

  • Resmaa Menakem, My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies
  • Bessel van der Kolk, M.D., The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma
  • Dr. Bettina L. Love, We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of the Educational Freedom
. . . . .
Introduction – Welcome to Justice Rising!

Featuring host and Justice Educator, Samantha Yanity and Executive Director, Will Rutt. On this episode, Samantha and Will share the inspiration behind Justice Rising and what listeners can anticipate in the first season. Listen here on: Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or Podbean

Questions?

Please contact us at ipjc@ipjc.org, or call 206 223-1138.